Gephi

scribner's.pngmurry.pnglewis.pngcrisis.pngboth.pngoverview.pngThe author and magazine that were the centers of influence were BLAST and Wyndham Lewis. Scribner’s magazine had a large center of influence as well but not as large as BLAST.

While authors had similar connections to the magazines, the magazines seemed to have greater importance. Especially in the case of Wyndham Lewis and BLAST, they have similar connections and are almost exactly the same. BLAST was the one that had more connections.

Murry from the Blue Review had few connections and edges. The Blue Review has more connections than Murry but it does shed light on the fact that they didn’t have a greater impact than some of the larger magazines.

One thing that was unexpected was the impact that the Crisis had didn’t have a large impact on what other people thought. If it did have a greater impact more people would be writing about it and would have more nodes. The amount of nodes from the Crisis was what caused further investigation. The nodes with the most connections are the art rather than the creator that made it. This means that people were more interested in the creation rather than the creator.

Done by Eli Jones, and William Grantham

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Network Theory

“The idea behind this study, clearly stated in its opening page, was, very simply, that network theory could offer a way to quantify plot, thus providing an essential piece that was still missing from computational analyses of literature. Once I started working in earnest, though, I soon realized that the machine-gathering of the data, essential to large-scale quantification, was not yet a realistic possibility. (Others, elsewhere, were already at work on this problem; but I wasn’t aware of it). So, from its very first section, the essay drifted from quantification to the qualitative analysis of plot: the advantage of thinking in terms of space rather than time; its segmentation into regions, instead of episodes; the new, nonanthropomorphic idea of the protagonist; or, even, the “undoing” of narrative structures occasioned by the removal of specific vertices in the network.”

-Franco Moretti,  “Network Theory, Plot Analysis”

Overall, I find this quote to demonstrate our transition from digital to humanities. The spatial analysis of literature is different as it focuses on “the qualitative analysis of the plot”, or the look at the connections between all elements in the work to discover how it exists. We have been investigating more technical elements of how a work is conveyed and created but this instead looks into the work’s characters, narrative, and common uses. Therefore, this is a more artistic side of the digital humanities.

 

“The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock”

The poem “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” by T. S., Elliot is a poem about how the speaker is worried about how other people view him and more importantly, how his lover sees him. The theme of the poem overall is love, a love that drives the speaker crazy. This causes him to be very indecisive about odd things. As an example the speaker asks if he “shall part [his] hair behind? Do I dare eat a peach?” Asking if he should dare eat a peach seems odd but in his defense he is stricken with love for a person and only wants to please them. The beauty of this poem is that it shows the thought process of a person who is in love but doesn’t outright say that the speaker loves the person the poem is meant for. It shows the love by being indecisive. This is why the theme of “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock” is about love.

Final Project

After an extensive amount of time and technical difficulties, I have completed my final project, which relates Mathematics to Art:

http://courses.utulsa.edu/engl2393jd/mathematics/index.php/Main_Page

Two of the greatest issues in doing this project were content and technology. Although most word content was simple, the examples, particularly one on geometric design, took much time to formulate and present. As for the technology aspect, formatting required much work. There were many features that needed to be adjusted before I could upload images, symbols, and videos. However, just as complicated was the process for having the images to upload. All of my images came from a combination of scanned images that I personally made, graphs produced on Mathematica, pictures straight from the internet, and images that I produced on Wordle. Once all of these images were with the rest of my content on a Microsoft Word file, they had to be copied into Paint, where they were saved as jpeg files. These files were then uploaded onto Flickr, after which I was able to get the URL links to embed the images onto my page. Fortunately, the word content from the Microsoft Word file copied straight into the wiki.

In my project, I address the applications of Mathematics, and particularly how Art is not often on the top of that list. I go on to explain how, although we don’t usually think about Math in the visual arts, it is still an underlying feature. There are also a few examples of how Math can be applied to Art, whether in geometric design or abstract art, which include formulas, images, and videos.

After all of the work that this project required, I can say that I have a much greater understanding of the complexity involved in digital media. In my project I used a wiki, which included Wordle images, my podcast video, and several other types of media images. Media becomes especially complex when more types of media are used. Still, I have found this overall experience to be very helpful for a future closely tied to the digital world, for which I believe I am better prepared.

Final Project: Archaeology and the Age of Technology

Hello Reader,

The following post is part of my final project assessment in my Digital Humanities course; it explains my reasoning for creating this blog in the first place.

For my final project in Intro to Digital Humanities I created a blog through WordPress dedicated to my major, archaeology. I chose to create a blog because I thought it would be interesting to discover whether blogging could be found beneficial within my field. Also my field has the reputation for being conventional, mostly consisting of book work, boring, and out dated. My ambition with this project is to dispute those claims and increase interest into archaeology again. As human beings I think it is essential that we are aware of our heritage and strive to preserve the achievements humanity has accomplished, not only to remember where we have been, but to learn from ourselves and better humanity in the future.

“If you would understand anything, observe its beginning and its development.”
-Aristotle

In my blog I focused mainly on incorporating the use of technology, various forms of digital media, and several other topics discussed in class. Furthermore I wrote about my current research, archaeological topics that interested me, excavations and archaeological surveys I am involved in, and several other projects I am working on. To my surprise I found blogging to be beneficial. Before hand I did not regard blogging in an academic sense.

However I found the most innovative features that blogging possessed were receiving/sending feedback and gaining mass exposure. It was flattering to receive feedback and “likes” from fellow archaeologists, professors, researchers, and other individuals from across the globe. Not only was it flattering, but the mass scale of exposure was astonishing. To further increase my blog exposure I posted links and attention grabbing prompts within the Archaeology Page on FaceBook. It was intriguing to witness how instantaneously I received responses. Even more surprisingly once I really got into blogging I had accumulated 93 homepage views in a single day, a current amount of 14 Word Press subscribers, 1,625 FaceBook subscribers, and an unexpected total of 737 total homepage views within only two months. After viewing these statistics it was clear to me blogging can most definitely be used academically and benefit any individual in any major.

I found the responses to be additionally useful and encouraging. I was offered guidance, given encouragement, suggested solutions to my questions, provided other people’s opinions and I found it rather entertaining to tee off controversial debates. Blogging made it possible to further expose my mind to new thoughts and ideas that I otherwise wouldn’t have come across. I think it is important that individuals in all fields of study take advantage of technology and what it can offer. Technology such as blogging encourages interaction and compels an individual to acquire knowledge through additional means and further expand one’s thought process.

Links

Homepage
About Author
Site, Ayn Abu Nukhaylah: TU Page
Digital Humanities Course
Archaeology FaceBook Page

Blog Posts (beginning from oldest to most recent)

Hello World
Multimedia and Archaeology
Archaeology Podcast
What’s Your Archive?
Mapping & Social Network Analysis in Archaeology
Archaeological Humor
New Manners of Thinking
Digitalization of Text
Reading & Textuality in Archaeology
Archaeological Survey in Hominy, Oklahoma
Archaeological Time Machine?? Think POSSIBLE

Thanks for reading and THANK YOU to all of my followers and those of you who responded to my posts! You all made this a very positive experience and I look forward to bettering my blogging potentiality. 🙂

Ashley Brown

Video Games, Digital Fiction & Poetry

I found many of the digital fictions and poetry we went over in class to be very similar in nature and function as video games. I play many video games and find it hard for one to successfully incorporate literature along with that. When looking at the digital poetry and fictions I found the “video game” aspects distracting and felt like they took away from the meaning of the literature. I also did not even find the meaning that the author was trying to convey and felt like the effort was a waste of time on both parts. However I can see how these forms of literature can further expand the potential of a work, but that all depends on the presentation.

Ashley Brown