Gephi

scribner's.pngmurry.pnglewis.pngcrisis.pngboth.pngoverview.pngThe author and magazine that were the centers of influence were BLAST and Wyndham Lewis. Scribner’s magazine had a large center of influence as well but not as large as BLAST.

While authors had similar connections to the magazines, the magazines seemed to have greater importance. Especially in the case of Wyndham Lewis and BLAST, they have similar connections and are almost exactly the same. BLAST was the one that had more connections.

Murry from the Blue Review had few connections and edges. The Blue Review has more connections than Murry but it does shed light on the fact that they didn’t have a greater impact than some of the larger magazines.

One thing that was unexpected was the impact that the Crisis had didn’t have a large impact on what other people thought. If it did have a greater impact more people would be writing about it and would have more nodes. The amount of nodes from the Crisis was what caused further investigation. The nodes with the most connections are the art rather than the creator that made it. This means that people were more interested in the creation rather than the creator.

Done by Eli Jones, and William Grantham

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Final Project: Archaeology and the Age of Technology

Hello Reader,

The following post is part of my final project assessment in my Digital Humanities course; it explains my reasoning for creating this blog in the first place.

For my final project in Intro to Digital Humanities I created a blog through WordPress dedicated to my major, archaeology. I chose to create a blog because I thought it would be interesting to discover whether blogging could be found beneficial within my field. Also my field has the reputation for being conventional, mostly consisting of book work, boring, and out dated. My ambition with this project is to dispute those claims and increase interest into archaeology again. As human beings I think it is essential that we are aware of our heritage and strive to preserve the achievements humanity has accomplished, not only to remember where we have been, but to learn from ourselves and better humanity in the future.

“If you would understand anything, observe its beginning and its development.”
-Aristotle

In my blog I focused mainly on incorporating the use of technology, various forms of digital media, and several other topics discussed in class. Furthermore I wrote about my current research, archaeological topics that interested me, excavations and archaeological surveys I am involved in, and several other projects I am working on. To my surprise I found blogging to be beneficial. Before hand I did not regard blogging in an academic sense.

However I found the most innovative features that blogging possessed were receiving/sending feedback and gaining mass exposure. It was flattering to receive feedback and “likes” from fellow archaeologists, professors, researchers, and other individuals from across the globe. Not only was it flattering, but the mass scale of exposure was astonishing. To further increase my blog exposure I posted links and attention grabbing prompts within the Archaeology Page on FaceBook. It was intriguing to witness how instantaneously I received responses. Even more surprisingly once I really got into blogging I had accumulated 93 homepage views in a single day, a current amount of 14 Word Press subscribers, 1,625 FaceBook subscribers, and an unexpected total of 737 total homepage views within only two months. After viewing these statistics it was clear to me blogging can most definitely be used academically and benefit any individual in any major.

I found the responses to be additionally useful and encouraging. I was offered guidance, given encouragement, suggested solutions to my questions, provided other people’s opinions and I found it rather entertaining to tee off controversial debates. Blogging made it possible to further expose my mind to new thoughts and ideas that I otherwise wouldn’t have come across. I think it is important that individuals in all fields of study take advantage of technology and what it can offer. Technology such as blogging encourages interaction and compels an individual to acquire knowledge through additional means and further expand one’s thought process.

Links

Homepage
About Author
Site, Ayn Abu Nukhaylah: TU Page
Digital Humanities Course
Archaeology FaceBook Page

Blog Posts (beginning from oldest to most recent)

Hello World
Multimedia and Archaeology
Archaeology Podcast
What’s Your Archive?
Mapping & Social Network Analysis in Archaeology
Archaeological Humor
New Manners of Thinking
Digitalization of Text
Reading & Textuality in Archaeology
Archaeological Survey in Hominy, Oklahoma
Archaeological Time Machine?? Think POSSIBLE

Thanks for reading and THANK YOU to all of my followers and those of you who responded to my posts! You all made this a very positive experience and I look forward to bettering my blogging potentiality. 🙂

Ashley Brown

Video Games, Digital Fiction & Poetry

I found many of the digital fictions and poetry we went over in class to be very similar in nature and function as video games. I play many video games and find it hard for one to successfully incorporate literature along with that. When looking at the digital poetry and fictions I found the “video game” aspects distracting and felt like they took away from the meaning of the literature. I also did not even find the meaning that the author was trying to convey and felt like the effort was a waste of time on both parts. However I can see how these forms of literature can further expand the potential of a work, but that all depends on the presentation.

Ashley Brown

Video Games and other Media

After looking particularly at the Platform Studies website on “Play the Past”, I feel that video games can relate to many other media forms that we have looked at over this semester, including books, archives, etc. This is based on the fact that like these media types, video games can be very educational or informative. Along with this, there are various genres of both video games and the other forms of media. However, at the same time video games are generally used for recreational purposes. In other words, people used them for fun, rather than to learn history, cultural, etc. Although many books and other media sources are also used for personal enjoyment, it is much more likely that a teacher would have his or her students to read a book or search an archive than assign them to play a video game. This is not to say that video games, for fun or educational purposes, are a waste, but it does seem that their educational uses may be a little more limited than typical educational sources.

Video Games

How do you see the relationships between video games and some of the other media we’ve looked at this semester?

Video games, and some of the online videos, poems and interactive sites we have seen this semester both make you learn about the story and purpose by going deeper into it. In video games you complete quests and do missions to dive into the story and game. In pomes like the ones from last class you have to interact with the story and media to read the poem.

Both use media interaction and give you control to search through the stories and learn about their purpose.